AMD CEO promises the firm’s ‘first priority is to gamers’ for GPUs

As we saw earlier, AMD has just revealed some impressive financial results, driven mainly by the Ryzen and second-generation Ryzen processors, but the company is understandably eager to move forward also on the front of the graphics cards, with the CEO guarantees that players are the priority of AMD, unlike cryptocurrency miners.

There is a growing demand for AMD hardware from those who extract virtual coins, as we have seen in recent times, with graphics cards that become thin, both for AMD and Nvidia players – and prices skyrocket as the offer does not satisfy the demand.

And although AMD will continue to sell products to crypto coin miners, in its post-results conference call, CEO Lisa Su emphasizes that players come first.

When the Registry informs, Su said: "Our first priority is for players, that is, through OEMs and key system integrators and electronic retailers, and we will continue to do so.

" We will also do it work with commercial miners; we talk and see what their forecasts are, so we have good visibility in the market. The blockchain infrastructure is here to stay, there are numerous currencies and applications that will keep things there. "

The interesting thing is that this comes immediately after AMD's barely veiled attack on the new Nvidia GeForce Partner Program last week, which it has been criticized in some sectors for being anti-competitive, and a measure that could result in lower consumer choice when it comes to buying a GPU.

Mainly because it is alleged that the Nvidia program offers serious benefits, including marketing funds , to the GPU manufacturers that register, but can only sell GeForce cards in their games brand and not rival products, and we have already seen that the Asus ROG brand became an exclusive Nvidia adventure, with AMD products renamed as Arez.

GPU in the hands of the players

All this led to the corporate VP of AMD of Radeon Gaming, Scott Herkelman, declaring Last week: "We are committed to putting high-performance graphics cards in the hands of as many players as possible and giving our partners the support they need without anticompetitive conditions."

And His comments after the revelation of these financial results undoubtedly underscores that claim. In general terms, it seems that AMD considers that it is the right time to do a great thing about a "professional player" position, in an effort to grow the GPU numbers in line with the great success of Ryzen.

As we have discussed before, there is no reason for AMD's new alternative brands, such as Arez, not to work well for the company in the long term. Particularly if their promises of openness, freedom of choice and "without player ties" can be associated with these new brands and make them stay in the mind of the consumer.